Baroreflex Activation Therapy (BAT, Baroreceptor Stimulation)

  

Baroreceptor stimulation is used to treat therapy-resistant arterial hypertension and is also an effective therapy option to treat a severely limited pumping function of the heart.

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Baroreflex Activation Therapy (BAT, Baroreceptor Stimulation)

What is a device for baroreceptor stimulation?
Baroreceptor stimulation is used to treat therapy-resistant arterial hypertension and is also an effective therapy option to treat a severely limited pumping function of the heart. Patients with heart failure suffer from an imbalance between the activity of the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous system with a resulting hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and simultaneously reduced activity of the parasympathetic system. This imbalance has negative effects on the disease progression. During baroreceptor stimulation, pressure receptors (baroreceptors) in the area of the carotid artery are stimulated by an implanted electrical pulse generator. As a result, the autonomic nervous system is affected in such a way that the sympathetic nervous system is attenuated and the parasympathetic nervous system is activated.

How are devices for baroreceptor stimulation implanted?
Devices for baroreceptor stimulation are implanted under general anesthesia in cooperation with the vascular surgery department. In the process, an electrode is placed on the pressure receptors (baroreceptors) in the area of the carotid artery and connected to a pulse generator. The generator is implanted under the skin or between the chest muscles, comparable to a pacemaker.
The follow-up of the BAT systems takes place at fixed intervals (every 6 to 12 months) at our pacemaker outpatient department.